Li Mengyu, Michael H. Prosser

Chinese Communicating Interculturally

19.80 USD, xxxi + 349 pages, paperback, 189x246mm

published June 2014

This book is the North American edition of "Communicating Interculturally", published by Higher Education Press, Beijing, PRC. Published in agreement with Higher Education Press.


 

About this book

Co-authoring interculturally, Professors Li Mengyu of Ocean University of China and Michael H. Prosser, Professor Emeritus at the University of Virginia have written Chinese Communicating Interculturally especially - but not only - for Chinese students, with 11 imaginary dialogues, 10 chapters, and more than 30 short guest essays.

In his foreword, Jia Yuxin writes: “Let’s remember: the challenge of globalization will always push everyone of us in the direction of greater learning, self-refinement, self-other reciprocal orientation, and intercultural or global  citizenship.’’


 

Chinese Communicating Interculturally can be ordered directly from Dignity Press.

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About the authors

Li Mengyu is the author of five books. She has been a visiting scholar in the US at the University of Louisville and Southeast Missouri State University and at the University of Cambridge in the UK. Her major academic interests include intercultural communication and comparative literature. She has won several academic awards, has undertaken research projects, and has attended international and national conferences. She has taught more than 3,000 Chinese students.
 
Michael H. Prosser has taught in Canada, China, Swaziland, and the US. Author/editor of 18 books and series editor of 17 books, he is a senior coeditor at the Intercultural Institute of the Shanghai International Studies University. A founder of the field of intercultural communication, he is listed in the Marquis Who’s Who in America, Asia, and the World and is a Fellow in the International Academy for Intercultural Research. His book The Cultural Dialogue has been translated into Japanese and Chinese. He maintains the blog www.michaelprosser. His blog at www.michaelprosser.com attracts readers from all over the world.


Michael H. Prosser is coauthor of two other Dignity Press books: Finding Cross-Cultural Common Ground and Social Media in Asia.

 

 

 

List of Guest Essays and Authors    xiii
Preface to the North American Edition    xvii
Foreword    xix
To the Reader     xxix


Chapter One: Culture    1
1.1 Dialogue    1
1.2 Culture    9
1.2.1     Definitions and the Nature of Culture    9
1.2.2    Cultural Survival    11
1.2.3    Objective and Subjective Culture    12
1.2.4    Globalism, Globalization and Cultural Universals    14
1.2.5    Cultural Stability or Cultural Change    16
1.2.6    Multiculturalism and Cultural Diversity    17
1.2.7    Popular Culture    19
1.3 Case Studies    20
1.3.1    An Intercultural Chinese and British Marriage: Striking an
Equilibrium    20
1.3.2     Korean Taekwondo Master Lee Meets Ms. Ruth     21
1.4     Summary    24
1.5 Questions for Discussion    25
1.6 Suggested Readings    26

Chapter Two: Communication and Intercultural Communication    27
2.1    Dialogue    27
2.2    Communication    34
2.2.1     Definition and Nature of Communication    34
2.2.2     Chinese Communication and the Civil Society    37
2.2.3     The Spectrum or Continuum of Intracultural, Intercultural
and Multicultural Communication    37
2.2.4     Cross-Cultural Communication    42
2.2.5     Intercultural Communication Competence (ICC)    44
2.2.6     Intercultural and International Ethical Communication    45
2.2.7     Intercultural Conflict Resolution    47
2.2.8     “Personal Motivational Persuasion” by the President of the
United States to Michael Prosser    48
2.2.9     Analysis of President Obama’s “Personal Motivational Persuasion”    49
2.2.10    Becoming Critical Thinkers    52
2.3    Case Study: The United Nations as an International
Communication Forum    53
2.4     Summary    55
2.5     Questions for Discussion    56
2.6 Suggested Readings    57

Chapter Three: Creating Our Own Cultural Stories    59
3.1     Dialogue    59
3.2    Li Mengyu’s Cultural Story     64
3.3      Michael Prosser’s Cultural Story: Monocultural to Multicultural    67
3.4      Cultural Stories of Several Young People     70
3.4.1    My Cultural Background (William Zhu, Shanghai International
Studies University)    70
3.4.2    From the Mini UN to the Real UN (Zhang Jing, the
United Nations, New York City)    74
3.4.3     The Value of Family, Education, and a Girl with a Russian Passport
(Anya Klyukanova, University of Oregon)    76
3.4.4    Open Heart and Immense Patience (Michelle Cui, Trading
Manager, Omicom Group, Chicago, Illinois)    77
3.4.5    From an Ordinary Family (David Xu, Tongji University)    78
3.4.6     The Story of My Nearly 30 Years (Jacky Zhang, Dezhou University)    79
3.4.7    Seattle and Christchurch: Twin Cities (Zizi Zhao Zhao,
Christchurch, New Zealand)    80
3.4.8    A Third Culture Child? (Nick Deng, Yunnan Normal University)    81
3.4.9    Lotus Seeds (Cindy Zhao, Shanghai)    82
3.5 Case Study: Contemporary Chinese Women    84
3.6 Summary     87
3.7 Questions for Discussion    88
3.8 Suggested Readings    90

Chapter Four: Perceptions, Beliefs, Worldviews and Values    91
4.1 Dialogue    91
4.2 Perceptions    97
4.2.1     Defining Perception    97
4.2.2     Culture and Perceptions    97
4.2.3     Perceptions and Media    99
4.2.4    Defining Belief    101
4.2.5    Stereotypes and Prejudices    102
4.2.6    Attitudes and Values    104
4.2.7    World Views    105
4.2.8    Defining Values More Fully    106
4.2.9    The Significance of Values to Intercultural Communication    107
4.2.10    Comparing Eastern and Western Values    108
4.3 Case Study: On the Traditional Chinese Value of “Harmony"    110
4.4 Summary    112
4.5 Questions for Discussion    113
4.6 Suggested Readings    114

Chapter Five: Cultural Patterns and Cross-Cultural Value Orientations    115
5.1 Dialogue    115
5.2 Understanding Cultural Patterns and Value Orientations    119
5.3 Chinese Scholars' Emphasis on Cultural Traits and Cultural
Orientations    120
5.3.1    Gu Hongming’s Study on Cutural Traits    120
5.3.2    Lin Yutang’s Study on Cultural Characteristics    121
5.3.3    Hui-ching Chang’s Study on Interpersonal Communication    122
5.3.4    Kwang-kuo Hwang’s Study on Interpersonal Relationships    122
5.4 Western Contributions    123
5.4.1    Clyde Kluckhohn’s and Fred Strodtbeck’s Value Orientations    123
5.4.2     Geert Hofstede’s National Value Dimensions    137
5.4.3     Edward T. Hall’s Value Orientations    146
5.4.4    Fons Trompenaars’s Value Dimensions    147
5.4.5     Shalom Schwartz’s Societal Orientations    149
5.5 Chinese Value Orientations    150
5.5.1     The Influence of the Traditional Chinese Value Orientations    150
5.5.2     The Contemporary Chinese Value Orientations    151
5.6 Case Study: Universal Human Rights as Universal Values    152
5.7 Summary    157
5.8 Questions for Discussion    158
5.9 Suggested Readings    159

Chapter Six: Verbal and Nonverbal Communication    161
6.1 Dialogue    161
6.2 The Nature of Language: Linguistic Aspects in Intercultural
Communication    171
6.2.1    Defining Language    171
6.2.2     The Importance of Language to Intercultural Communication    172
6.2.3    The Functions of Language and Transmitting Culture    173
6.2.4    Communicative Interaction    174
6.2.5     Language as an Expression of Identity    174
6.2.6    Meaning, Thought and Culture    174
6.2.7    Taoism’s and Confucianism’s Interpretations of Language    176
6.2.8     A Review of Some Theories on Language and Culture    176
6.3    Intercultural Nonverbal Communication    179
6.3.1    Defining Nonverbal Communication    179
6.3.2     The Importance of Nonverbal Communication    180
6.3.3     Nonverbal Communication Classifications    181
6.4 The Role of English in Chinese Education    188
6.4.1    Chinese Children and Youth Learning English    188
6.4.2    English Language Companies and Tests    189
6.4.3    English and Bilingual Teaching Reforms in Chinese Higher
  Education    190
6.4.4    Social, Cultural, and Economic Boundaries in Learning English    191
6.4.5    Chinese Students Studying in the United States    191
6.4.6    Li Yang: A Crazy Talker    192
6.5 Case Study:  "English is a Crazy Language"     193
6.6 Summary    199
6.7 Questions for Discussion    200
6.8 Suggested Readings    201

Chapter Seven: Contemporary Youth    203
7.1 Dialogue    203
7.2 Selected Examples of Contemporary Youth     207
7.2.1    American Contemporary Youth: The Millennials     207
7.2.2    Argentine Contemporary Youth    212
7.2.3     Belgian Youth: A Free Person with Rights and Responsibility    214
7.2.4    Chinese Contemporary Youth: The Post 1980s Generation    216
7.2.5     Egyptian Youth: Past, Present, and Future    218
7.2.6     Indian Contemporary Youth    222
7.2.7     Japanese Youth Today: The Global Generation    223
7.2.8    Youth in Modern Russia    224
7.2.9     Togo: Corridor and Smile of Western Africa    226
7.3 Case Study: Making the World Your Classroom    228
7.4 Summary    230
7.5 Questions for Discussion    231
7.6 Suggested Readings    233

Chapter Eight: Cultural Media    235
8.1 Dialogue    235
8.2 Media and Mass Communication Theories    246
8.3 Broadcasting Theory    248
8.4 International and Global Media Theories    250
8.5 Media Diplomacy     252
8.6 Cinema    254
8.6.1    Assessing Intercultural and International Cinema    254
8.6.2     Chinese Cinema: A Challenging Chinese Film: “Nanjing! Nanjing!
  City of Life and Death”    255
8.7 Chinese Computer-Mediated Communication    257
8.8 Case Study: Wrangling the Media Market Place    258
8.9 Summary    260
8.10  Questions for Discussion    261
8.11  Suggested Readings    262

Chapter Nine: Intercultural Communication in Business, Training,
and Education    263
9.1 Dialogue    263
9.2 Intercultural Business and International Trade    267
9.2.1    The Importance of Intercultural Communication in Global
Financial Relations    267
9.2.2    Intercultural Business Communi-cation and International Trade    268
9.2.3    Organizational Culture    270
9.2.4    Advertising Theories    271
9.3 Intercultural Training for Global Business People    273
9.4 Intercultural Education in Urumqi    274
9.5 Practical Applications    275
9.5.1    Global Knowledge and Local Wisdom    275
9.5.2    The Rules of My Brazilian Manager—Or Brazilian Culture?    277
9.5.3    Touching the Tiger’s Tail    278
9.5.4    Multicultural Training and Teaching Business English    279
9.5.5    Abstract for an MA Thesis as an Illustration of Research Related
  to Business Communication: On Managing Cultural Integration
  in Cross-border Acquisitions from the Perspective of China’s
  IT Industry    280
9.6 Case Study: The McDonaldization of Society    281
9.7 Summary    283
9.8 Questions for Discussion    284
9.9 Suggested Readings    286

Chapter Ten: Intercultural Theories and Research    287
10.1 Dialogue    287
10.2 Theorizing about Intercultural Communication    291
10.2.1    Intercultural Identity Theories    291
10.2.2    Intercultural Accommodation or Adaptation Theories    292
10.3 Cross-Cultural Communication    293
10.3.1    Defining Intercultural and Cross-Cultural Communication
Research    293
10.3.2    Principles or Criteria Guiding Cross-Cultural Communication
Research    294
10.3.3    Illustrative Examples of Effective Cross-Cultural
Communication Research    295
10.3.4     Illustrative Problems in Western versus Non-Western Cross-
Cultural Communication Research    296
10.4 A Researcher’s Journey: Some Issues in Intercultural
Communication    297
10.4.1     Theoretical and Methodological Diversity    297
10.4.2     Interpersonal Conflict: A Brief Demonstration    298
10.4.3     Some Implications    298
10.5 Intercultural and Cross-Cultural Research in China    299
10.6 Developing Your Own Intercultural Research    300
10.6.1     Front Matter: Title Page, Abstract and Table of Contents    300
10.6.2     The Introduction    305
10.6.3     The Literature Review    305
10.6.4     The Methodology    306
10.6.5     The Discussion of Results    307
10.6.6     The Conclusion, References and Appendices    307
10.7 Honesty and Integrity: The Hallmark of an Ethical University
Education and Research    308
10.8 Case Studies: MA Thesis Abstracts and Keywords Related to Youth    309
10.8.1     Reconsidering Schwartz’s 10 Basic Human Value Types and
Locating Chinese Young People    309
10.8.2     Psychological Adjustment of Farmer Laborers’ Children in
Yangzhou City: The Identity Conflict of Migrant Children under
the Background of the Urban-Rural Dualistic Social System    310
10.8.3     Integrating Experiential Learning Techniques into
Intercultural Communication Courses    310
10.8.4     The Influence of Ethnic Identity and Intergroup Contact on
Intercultural Communication: A Study at a Chinese University
for Minorities    312
10.8.5    Bilingual Education and Intercultural Communication Among
Uyghurs in Xinjiang, China    312
10.8.6     Chinese Students’ Acculturation in the UK and Their Use of
Xiaonei    313
10.8.7     Styles of Managing Interpersonal Conflicts Between American
and Chinese University Students    314
10.8.8 Structural Equivalence of Value Domains in China: Values Among
Migrant Workers and Local Permanent Residents in Shanghai    314
10.9 Summary    316
10.10  Questions for Discussion    316
10.11  Suggested Readings    318

Epilogue: A Final Conversation—Think Globally and Act Locally    319

References    323
Academic Biographies of Li Mengyu and Michael H. Prosser    345
Acknowledgment    349

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